Luxury House Design – Water Tower

Zecc architects has developed a fully functional residence from an old abandoned water tower. The water tower dates back to 1930s and is located in Soest, it was originally designed by H.F. Mertens in 1931. Zecc were tasked with converting the 24meter structure into a luxury dwelling while still preserving the characteristics from the past.

According to the architects, the transformation processes was a challenging one.

“Many problems had to be overcome; letting more daylight in and strengthening the relationship with the back courtyard by inserting a three-level high window frame; maintaining the interior’s industrial characteristics by working with materials like steel, concrete and glass; and in the tower, ensuring an effective, efficient layout for several small round rooms that lay one on top of the other, while preserving the tower’s spaciousness, to name a few.”

[ Via Environment Team]

14
Jun 2011
AUTHOR eOffice
CATEGORY

Tech

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Sustainable House Design by H Arquitectes

This green and sustainable house was designed by H Arquitectes in the rural areas of Catalunya Spain. It is built on a platform of natural rock, designed to be extremely easy to build. What’s more, it makes use of dry building methods that save substantial amounts of water – something especially important in arid areas. This also means that the financial and temporal investment is minimal.

The inner layout of the house is based on a lineal sequence of rooms, which are all of different proportions and linked to the structure. Part of the beauty of the design is that the building can work either as an open-spaced layout if required, or alternatively as a closed one. The house’s use of natural wood for the outer shell of the building seems to be a perfect match to its surroundings, blending in seamlessly with the natural environment in which it sits.

Photos via H Arquitectes

21
Dec 2010
AUTHOR eOffice
CATEGORY

Design

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Casa Fez – Portugal

Casa Fez is a new development built by the well known Portuguese architect Álvaro Leite Siza Vieira. He is the the son of  Álvaro Siza Vieira, probably Portugal’s  greatest and well known architect – winner of the 1992 Pritzker Prize and the 1988 Alvar Aalto Medal. The son, Álvaro Leite Siza Vieira, was born in 1962 and is a graduated from the Faculty of Architecture in Escola do Porto. He is most prominently  known for his Casa Tolo in northern Portugal, and  designed Casa Fez for his personal use

The house is characterised by an abundance of natural light, which interplays nicely with the use of wooden floors. The windows are also all unadorned, giving the project a clean aesthetic feeling which is not too dissimilar to a modern art museum or gallery. In some ways perhaps the project lacks a homely fee, perhaps it is something which is better admired from a distance rather than admired through use? What do you think?

[Pictures via]

01
Jul 2009
AUTHOR eOffice
CATEGORY

Design, Offices

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The Push Button House by Adam Kalkin is an innovative green den

Adam Kalkin designed the Push Button House that was first displayed at Art Basel Miami in 2005. It is a very innovative design that starts out as a shipping container and after the button is pushed, it transforms into a house. The motorized walls open up to reveal a functional house with elegant and stylish furniture. The mechanism includes hydraulic power to lift and lower the sides of the shipping container. Another good thing about the concept is that it uses recycled and recyclable materials. Take a look at the pictures of the house and I think you will agree that it looks super stylish and trendy. The Push Button House is priced between US $150,000 and $175,000.

source: GreenLaunches

29
May 2009
AUTHOR eOffice
CATEGORY

Design, Offices

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Base Valley House, Japan, by Hiroshi Sambuichi

This beautiful family home, designed by Hiroshi Sambuichi, takes a leap to set a balance between nature and building. To accomplish this, Sambushi chose high-quality natural materials including Japanese cypress, chestnut wood, and crushed stone. He created a design that allows the flow of air to move throughout.

13
May 2009
AUTHOR eOffice
CATEGORY

Design

COMMENTS 1 Comment